About the profession


A guide to buying translation
For non-linguists, buying translations can be frustrating. This guide is aimed at reducing stress and helping you get the most out of your translation budget. Clic here to download this guide (PDF) from the American Translators Association.

Big companies that use translations regularly know what the job involves, and know what to look for. Depending on your needs and the size of your business, you may need the help of a larger translation agency that can handle several languages or big amounts of words. But if you are a medium or small business and have a limited budget, in the guide mentioned above you can find tips to prepare your text for translation. These are things like: choosing what to translate, formatting your documents so it the translator does not have to convert or re-format the material. 

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Intelligent Quality
“...Air France (…) sought—in a fiercely competitive industry—to promote a special bring-along-the-spouse offer under the extraordinary slogan: ‘Air France Wants You to Fly United.’ ”
(quote from Translation Journal)

Mistranslations or translations that do not take the cultural context into account won’t get your message across in the best of the cases. At their worst, they can hurt your business, as in the example above.

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Support quotes from peers about the business side of it all

«Never offer volume discounts because these projects simply tie you up when you could be working for higher rates, looking for other work or enjoying your free time, which you should value. It merely means you will be working for a substandard rate for longer.»

«Each time a client asks a translator to “make a gesture of goodwill” he or she is asking that person to forego a part of his or her life. That’s not business, it’s blackmail.» 

When agencies try to push our fees down, we can send this video over:

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